24 August 2007

Pop-culture necessities

When I started going to institute, in the time I refer to as "the good ol' days," it was common knowledge that one requirement to be my friend was the ability to appreciate the humor of "Billy Madison." Life was simpler then. There was no urgency toward planning my life, but rather to simply figure out who I am. With each new calender I've altered my standards-lowering some, raising others, forming new ideas of what I need from others. I'll probably post more about this some other day. My intent today is to find out if you have any requirements--is there a book you think everyone should read? Something so important that if someone doesn't like it, you know your friendship will never progress past casual acquantaince?
Also, I've added a book list and would Love your input--What should I add? What are your fav. books? What books do you remember from Childhood?

7 comments:

Rachel said...

The Office. Definitely. I actually had an experience once where I had dinner with two girls, friends of a friend, who were both lovely and charming and delightful. But about halfway through our meal I referenced the Office and one of them said, "I watched about 5 minutes of that and didn't think it was very funny." and the other said, "I don't like that kind of humor." And I instantly and very seriously thought, "I can't possibly be friends with these girls. What a shame."

Heather said...

I'm sad to say it, but I was one of them--not a girl you had dinner with (obviously) but a nonbeliever of The Office...until the end of the 2nd season when you introduced me to the finale and I became interested. Then later that summer my sister lovingly made me watch it, at which point I fell in LOVE!

Liz said...

For me, there are things that I love, that I'm sure a lot of my friends don't (or at least not as much as me) and I'm okay with that.

My big thing is: Do they make me laugh? Not laugh all the time, but they have humor and can say or do funny things.

If they can make me laugh, then I can be friends with them.

Rachel said...

Yes, Heather, but you like it now and that's what's important. I'm hoping that the lovely, charming girls have since given it a chance and have changed their minds.

The book that had the biggest impact on me as a child was The Outsiders. My 5th grade teacher, Mr. O'Clock (I'm not kidding, that was his name) read it to us and it was the first book that ever broke my heart. I cried for days. I still do every time I reread it.

Heather said...

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA...poor guy was probably made fun of as a kid...

Heather said...

As a kid I loved The Baby-Sitters Club books. Then I moved on to Madeleine L'Engle's books. I dont expect everyone else to like them, but I was a weird friendless child and speant most of my time reading. It's true-when my mom wanted punish me, or if I had chores to do, she'd hide my books! that would drive me crazy! I remember reading The Gammage Cup (another of my fav's) when I was finally able to find my book--I finished reading it in the bathroom and put it back in it's hiding place...she left my books alone for a while because she thought I was still reading that one. :-)

Mz. Liz said...

I love the Time Quartet too - Madeline L'Engle is truly a touched writer. I love her. I loved a lot of the classics growing up. The first book that kept me up all night because I had to finish it was 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. I was like 10. The Chronicles of Narnia were also very formative as well.

And I think some of my pop-culture friendship sentinals are the best of Mike Myers and Chris Farley. Those are both necessary viewing for me. And Monty Python - if they don't get that they probably won't get me. And Pure Drivel by Steve Martin - thats an important book too.